NPR

Through Food Art, Asian-Americans Stop 'Pushing Heritage To The Back Burner'

Some Asian-American artists are sculpting the dishes of their youth to explore their race and identity. And through Instagram, they're also connecting with others who yearn for a taste of their past.
Artist Stephanie Shih remembers making pork-filled dumplings with her family and started her art project by sculpting six of them out of porcelain. She's now made 600. Source: Robert Bredvad

Three American women of Taiwanese descent are cooking up the dishes of their youth: dumplings, roasted pork belly, sticky rice buns, shaved ice.

Except they're not using food. They're using materials like plaster, paint and porcelain.

Remarkably, the artists don't know each other in real life, only through Instagram. But they share a common goal: to re-create the foods of their culture in sculpture to pay homage to their heritage.

Making sculptures of food isn't new to, 26, a Chinese-American writer, art critic and curator. Recently, many Asian-American artists have been continuing to use food as a means to explore race and identity.

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da NPR

NPR3 min lettiMedical
Coronavirus Is Surging: How Severe Is Your State's Outbreak?
View NPR's maps and graphics to see where COVID-19 is hitting hardest in the U.S., which state outbreaks are growing and which are leveling off.
NPR1 min letti
Ken Jennings: Who Is First 'Jeopardy!' Guest Host?
"There will only ever be one Alex Trebek, but I'm honored to be helping Jeopardy! out with this in January," Jennings, one of the show's all-time top winners, said following the announcement Monday.
NPR2 min lettiAmerican Government
David Dinkins, New York City's First Black Mayor, Dies At 93
Dinkins, who defeated incumbent Ed Koch in the Democratic mayoral primary, went on to lead the city in the 1990s during a time of economic and racial strife.