Los Angeles Times

Review: 'Shoah: Four Sisters' marks the final chapter in Claude Lanzmann's decades-long chronicle to preserve the history of the Holocaust

Until almost the day he died, the Holocaust would not let Claude Lanzmann rest.

Even though the French director's 1985 "Shoah" has a running time of 9 1/2 hours, making it one of the longest documentaries ever, he was unhappy with the large amount of material he'd left out, stories and characters he felt were significant but that there simply hadn't been room for.

So starting with 1997's "A Visitor From the Living," Lanzmann mined his hundreds of hours of interviews to produce stand-alone documentaries

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