SAIL

Happily Hooked

If you are cruising, you need at least two anchors on board for the simple reason that you must have a backup. Imagine having to slip your anchor on a stormy night with other boats dragging down on yours, or having your rope rode severed by some unseen underwater obstacle, setting you adrift. If not up the creek without a paddle, you’d be on the beach without an anchor. The backup anchor is usually called the kedge, after the verb meaning to move a ship in a desired direction by means of a small anchor.

A kedge is not merely a backup to be held in reserve for emergencies, though; it can be used in a number of ways as part of your everyday cruising armory.

Any kind of anchor can be a kedge, including a fisherman, plow, Danforth-style or modern scoop anchor. Because kedges usually only are subjected to straight-line pulls, there is no need to carry one that

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da Sail

Sail1 min letti
The Sailing Scene
Are you out there sailing, cruising and living the sailing life? Share your experiences with other readers. Send your photos to sailmail@sailmagazine.com And don’t forget to sign up for our free eNewsletter, Under Sail, via our website sailmagazine.c
Sail4 min lettiScience & Mathematics
Binoculars 101
There are tons of different kinds of binoculars, and it’s easy to get lost in the technical terms and minutia. But what makes a pair suitable for marine use? And what do you actually need? Whether you’re looking to upgrade or just window shop the lat
Sail5 min letti
Ask Sail
Q: Our J/Boat mainsail has a bolt rope that feeds directly into the slot on the mast. Another rope feeds into a similar slot in the boom. I have always wondered: do boats sail better with a loose-footed mainsail not attached to the entire length of t