Better Nutrition

HEALTHY EATING made easy


Based on the traditional diet of Greece, southern Italy, and Spain, the Mediterranean diet focuses on high consumption of vegetables, fruits, olive oil, legumes, and whole grains, along with moderate fish, dairy, and red wine consumption, and infrequent use of meat. It’s a plan worth following: studies show that the Mediterranean diet lowers the risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, and early death; more recent studies also link it with increased brain health in older adults and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Take full advantage of this healthy eating plan with these 10 simple tips.

1 DOUBLE (OR TRIPLE) YOUR VEGGIES

We’re not kidding: the cornerstone of the Mediterranean diet is lots and lots of vegetables. Research overwhelmingly supports the health benefits of a plant-heavy diet: one study found that people who ate seven or more servings of fruit and vegetables per day had a reduced risk of dying from cancer and heart disease. In another study, more than five servings per day slashed the risk of heart attack, stroke, cancer,

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