NPR

For Teens, Dystopian Fiction Seems Pretty Real — And That's Why They Like It

Dystopian novels are all about consequences, choices and gray areas. Psychologists say that plays right into the sweet spot of the developing teenage brain.
Source: LA Johnson

This piece originally ran in 2017.

The plots of dystopian novels can be amazing. A group of teens in Holland, Mich., tells me about some of their favorites:

In Delirium by Lauren Oliver, Love is considered a disease. Characters get a vaccine for it. In Marissa Meyer's Renegades, the collapse of society has left only a small group of humans with extraordinary abilities. They work to establish justice and peace in their new world.

Scott Westerfeld's is on everyone's favorite list. The plot goes

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