Los Angeles Times

All around the world, humans are forcing other mammals to be more active at night

Human encroachment is pushing wild mammals all over the globe to increasingly become creatures of the night, moving their daytime activities toward the darker hours, a new study finds.

This day-to-night shift, described in the journal Science, could have a host of implications for the health and survival of these species - and the structure of their ecosystems as a whole.

Roughly 75 percent of the world's land surface has been impacted by humans, researchers say - and as animals have been trapped in these shrinking parcels of pristine land,

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