NPR

When Going Gluten-Free Is Not Enough: New Tests Detect Hidden Exposure

For people with celiac disease, incidental ingestion of gluten can lead to painful symptoms and lasting intestinal damage. Two new studies suggest such exposure may be greater than many realize.
A tray of gluten-free pastries. For people with celiac disease, incidental ingestion of gluten can lead to to painful symptoms and lasting intestinal damage. Two new studies suggest such exposure may be greater than many realize, even for those following gluten-free diets. Source: JPM

For the 3 million people in America (myself included) with celiac disease — an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of gluten — culinary life is a series of intricate leaps, accommodations and back-steps. We peer at labels, know the difference between "gluten-free" and "certified-gluten free" and keep a dedicated set of dishes and pots at home to avoid contamination by flour dust, crumbs of bread, and bits of pasta indulged in by family members or roommates.

Even so, there are regular mishaps — like the gluten free that weren't, or the news this past February that Chobani had of Flip Key Lime Crumble yogurt because they contained gluten, even though the containers were labeled gluten free.

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da NPR

NPR3 min letti
Questions For Zen Cho, Author Of 'Black Water Sister'
In Zen Cho's new novel, a young woman begins to hear a voice in her head: It's the dead, estranged grandmother she never knew. Wronged in life, the grandmother wants revenge after death.
NPR2 min lettiEarth Sciences
Cyclone Hits India On Deadliest Day Of Pandemic
At least 16 people have been killed by cyclone Tauktae, the most powerful storm to hit India's west coast in decades. Among those evacuated to higher ground were COVID-19 patients.
NPR1 min lettiCrime & Violence
Supreme Court Restricts Police Authority To Enter A Home Without A Warrant
At the center of the case was a man whose guns were confiscated from his home. Justice Clarence Thomas noted the recognition that officers perform many civic tasks but they're not open-ended.