The Guardian

How to boost your business? Let workers sleep | Matthew Walker

My research shows that everything from profits to creativity is improved when employees are well rested
‘Under-slept employees are not going to drive your business forward with productive innovation.’ Photograph: Alamy

I have long been puzzled by the entrenched mentality, and often enforced practice, of longer work hours and less sleep. Innumerable policies exist within the workplace regarding smoking, substance abuse, ethical behaviour and injury and disease prevention. But insufficient sleep – another physically and mentally harmful, and potentially deadly factor – is commonly tolerated and even, woefully, encouraged.

Many business leaders still believe that time on-task equates to productivity. Even in the industrial era of rote factory work, this was untrue. It is a misguided fallacy, and an, and often glorify the high-powered executive who is on email until 1.30am and in the office by 5.45 the following morning?

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