Apple Magazine

DNA-GATHERING VACUUM, 3-D LASER SCANNER AMONG OMAHA POLICE’S TOOLS AS DETECTIVE WORK GETS EVEN MORE HIGH-TECH

Gone are the days of strictly old-school detective work.

Omaha police can now collect more DNA from cold-case evidence and analyze data from smart watches, homes and vehicles.

The department also may acquire software allowing detectives to walk through a crime scene in virtual reality so they can examine angles, search for clues and see a witness’s viewpoint.

While detectives have been able to search cellphones and swab for DNA for years, technology for both electronic and physical forensics has advanced even further — securing solid evidence that can aid law enforcement

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