Popular Science

Why are we so bad at producing the right flu vaccines?

And how can we improve?
vaccine vials

Stark lighting on a white background makes everything look kind of creepy, huh?

Everyone loves to be the stickler who points out how ineffective the flu vaccine is, or how poor our track record is on predicting the right match. The shot has to protect against three or four distinct viruses, each with their own unique genetic profile, and often the annual prediction is off. Cue the naysayers.

And they’re not wrong. Why is it to make? And how can we get better?

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