Bloomberg Businessweek

Poor Little Rich Folks

Uneasy Street chronicles the conflicted lives of New York’s gilded class. Get out your tiny violins.

A good friend of mine has her own architecture firm in New York, and much of the time, she says, she’s basically a therapist. She gently guides her clients through the psychic crucible of their town house renovations and ground-up Hamptons construction, trying to make sure they suffer no mental breakdowns in the process. This is the emotionally fraught life event that the sociologist Rachel Sherman in her book Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of Affluence chooses to focus on. In particular, and with what she

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