The Millions

Literature’s Inherited Trauma: On Jesmyn Ward’s ‘Sing, Unburied, Sing’

The dead chase the living in Sing, Unburied, Sing, Jesmyn Ward’s new novel about the legacy of trauma. In Ward’s last novel, Salvage the Bones, the main character is preoccupied with the mythological tale of Medea, a woman left heartbroken. Here, Ward traces an American highway odyssey, from the Mississippi Gulf Coast to Parchman Farm, the notorious state penitentiary. Bouncing between the past and present, between ghosts and breathing bodies, between drug-induced fantasy and raw, heartbreaking reality, Sing, Unburied, Sing follows a family that seems to descend from earlier novels like Beloved and , uniting past and present suffering.  Ward’s fiction is about inherited trauma in a deeply divided society, where the oppressor and the oppressed share a legacy.

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Interessi correlati

Altro da The Millions

The Millions12 min letti
Annotate This: On Marginalia
When Shylock gives his celebrated soliloquy—“If you prick us, do we not bleed?”—the previous owner approvingly added in the margins “Bring your own BOOYEA!” The post Annotate This: On Marginalia appeared first on The Millions.
The Millions5 min letti
Jenny Offill Exerts Herself
I don’t love the language that’s available to talk about this stuff. If you’re not drawn to earnestness, how do you make yourself a more engaged person? The post Jenny Offill Exerts Herself appeared first on The Millions.
The Millions4 min letti
Must-Read Poetry: January 2020
Smith’s lines will hypnotize you, but also wake you, as in: “i’m waiting for a few folks // i love dearly to die so i can be myself. / please don’t make me say who.” The post Must-Read Poetry: January 2020 appeared first on The Millions.