NPR

How Smartphones Are Making Kids Unhappy

Psychologist Jean Twenge has observed dramatic shifts in behavior among children who go through adolescence with smartphones. They're spending less time with friends and reporting greater anxiety.
Psychologist Jean Twenge says smartphones have brought about dramatic shifts in behavior among the generation of children who grew up with the devices. / Getty Images

For the first time, a generation of children is going through adolescence with smartphones ever-present. Jean Twenge, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University, has a name for these young people born between 1995 and 2012: "iGen."

She says members of this generation are physically safer than those who came before them. They drink less, they learn to drive later and

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da NPR

NPR4 min letti
'How We Fight For Our Lives' Is One Life Story That Finds Connection To Others
Extremely personal, emotionally gritty, and unabashedly honest, Saeed Jones' memoir somehow manages a perfect balance between love and violence, hope and hostility, transformation and resentment.
NPR4 min lettiPolitics
How Bolivia's Evo Morales Could Win A 4th Term As President
He's already the country's longest-serving leader — almost 14 years in office. His party controls all government branches and much of the national media. Now he's poised to win a new term on Oct. 20.
NPR9 min letti
The Inconvenient Truth: Fixing Climate Requires Major Economic Change, Klein Says
We speak with journalist and climate activist Naomi Klein about her book "On Fire: The Burning Case for a Green New Deal."