Newsweek

Algorithms Might Fight Suicide Better Than Clinicians

By finding useful patterns among dozens or hundreds of risk factors, machine learning algorithms could be better at predicting suicides than humans.
By finding useful patterns among dozens or hundreds of risk factors, machine learning algorithms could be better at predicting suicides than humans.
03_10_Suicide_01 Source: Richard Wareham Fotografie/Getty

Each year in the United States, more than 40,000 people die by suicide, and from 1999 to 2014, the suicide rate increased 24 percent. You might think that after generations of theories and data, we would be close to understanding how to prevent self-harm, or at least predict it. But a new study concludes that the science of suicide prediction is dismal, and the established warning signs about as accurate as tea leaves.

There is, however, some hope. New research shows that machine-learning algorithms can dramatically improve our predictive abilities on suicides. In a new survey in the February issue of , researchers looked at 365 studies from the past 50 years that included 3,428 different measurements of risk factors, such as genes, mental illness and abuse. After a meta-analysis, or a synthesis of the results in these published studies, they

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da Newsweek

Newsweek4 min lettiSociety
Journalist's Fearless Investigation of Mexico Massacre
Journalist Anabel Hernández has been investigating collusion between government officials and drug cartels, as well as the illicit drug trade and abuse of power, for Mexico’s biggest publications for more than two decades.
Newsweek2 min letti
How Superheroes Cope With Saving The World
“You can’t live a life of violence and not feel the violence deep in your heart and your soul.”
Newsweek7 min lettiPolitics
How a Social Media Post in Russia Can Land You in Jail
It was just before 6 a.m. when police officers raided Daniil Markin’s apartment in Barnaul, a small Russian city some 2,000 miles from Moscow. Markin, a film student who was 18 at the time of the July 2017 raid, had no idea why police had burst into