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When Eating Dairy Was a Life-or-Death Question

Clay sieves used to filter cheese in Poland 7,500 years ago are remarkably similar to ones used in recent times.Salque et al. / Nature

Perforated pottery shards sat alongside cattle bones at the Polish dig site. There archaeologists collected fragments from bowls, cooking pots, and flasks and brought them back to the United Kingdom. At his lab at the University of Bristol, Richard Evershed discovered something on the unglazed clay: the oldest evidence of milk-fat residues on the continent. The farmers, some of the first in Europe, had been making cheese at the site roughly 7

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