Newsweek

How to Make a Feature Film in the Suburbs

Joel Levinson decided that to give his film career a shot, he needed to move to Yellow Springs, Ohio. Now his film, "Boy Band," is set to be released in 2017.
Joel Levinson decided that to give his film career a shot, he needed to move to Yellow Springs, Ohio. Now his film, "Boy Band," is set to be released in 2017.
Joel Levinson Source: Matthew Collins/Levinson Brothers

After suffering through various crappy jobs through his 20s, Joel Levinson discovered a scheme that would change his life after landing a gig as a mascot for a smoothie company. He earned the honor of wearing a cup costume by winning an online video contest. He realized other brands were hosting similar contests with cash prizes, all with little competition. He entered as many as he could.

So many, in fact, that he was able to support himself with the earnings, like the $100,000 he got from Klondike. His mastery of the form garnered national attention. In 2008, he was profiled by The New York Times and appeared on The Tonight Show. In early 2009

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